Saturday, May 16, 2009

And so it grows on...

My little seed babies are now toddlers. Things are growing well, and I continue to baby my crop and worry over them daily. Growing plants from seed is so much different than stopping by the nursery and selecting the most perfect starts you can spy.

It is awfully rewarding, though, to see something start so miniscule and grow into a full on plant. I can hardly imagine the joy I'll feel when I harvest my first tomato.

This year I chose to purchase heirloom seeds for my garden. In the interest of bio-diversity and sustainability I felt these seeds were worth the extra money. Plus I bought them from a small company not too far away from here (Victory Seed Company in Eastern Oregon), which makes me feel good about supporting a local company and assures me that my plants will do well in this climate. I spent a total of $48 and selected the following seeds for my garden.

Butterhead Lettuce
Bibb Lettuce
Bloomsdale Long Standing Spinach
Sweet Basil
Green Arrow Pea (shelling variety)
Oregon Sugar Pod Pea II
Atlantic Broccoli
Black Beauty Eggplant
Muncher Cucumber (burpless slicer)
Honey Rock Melon (canteloup)
Blue Lake Pole Bean
Italian Parsely
Detroit Dark Red Beet
Salsa Tomato
Roma VF Tomato
Red Grape Tomato
Red Brandywine Tomato
Zinnia 'Lilliput Mix'

I had some pickling cucumbers and Danvers carrot seeds leftover from last year, and I will use those as well. I am also purchasing a few bell pepper starts as they are the toughest seeds to start, and I didn't get an early enough start to be successful with them.

We also have several fruit trees, which are really The Mail Man's pet project. Last year he planted cherry, apple, pear, and peach trees. This year there are *hundreds* of tiny fruits on the branches. We're going to need to do some research on how to keep them healthy and thin things so the limbs don't explode. We're kind of shocked that two year old plants could be producing so much fruit?!?

I'm using the Squarefoot Gardening method for my plant spacing and succession planting guide. So far we've spent about $50 on compost, peat moss, starter pellets, and soil additives to build our newest boxes and amend last year's soil.

I'll be harvesting spinach sometime this week, and lettuce will be coming soon. I can see why gardening is one of the most popular pastimes in history. Ask me again in August....but I'm pretty sure I'm a "lifer". If things go well this year...there will be more boxes next year...and things like rhubarb, asparagus, potatoes and strawberries.

What are you growing this year?
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7 comments:

  1. A baby!!! I would love to start a garden, but this just isn't the year so I will have to live vicariously through your garden.

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  2. Nothing growing at our house - unless you count what our CSA is growing. And we are anxious to see just what goodies will come in our new CSA's weekly boxes... -S

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  3. I'm seriously jealous of the goodies that will grow in your garden. I'm going to get my seedlings next weekend from the market!

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  4. I'd say judging by my lack of housekeeping we are growing mold. ;-)

    Oh yeah, and some basil, cilantro, rosemary, thyme ...

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  5. Wow! You guys are going to have a great garden! I can't imagine doing it from seeds! Maybe after I've got a few gardens under my belt...Can't wait to hear how it all tastes!

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  6. This year I'm growing some tomatoes, rhubarb, and a handful of herbs. I can't wait to all your veggies!

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  7. Yay!

    I just put out 4 blueberry bushes today. 2 apple trees went in a few weeks ago. We're eating bunches of raspberries, peas, beets, and lettuces. Asparagus was a bit tired this year-Must amend soil. Strawberries were completely demolished by critters. Onions, radishes, carrots, bush beans, kale, tomatoes all doing well. So far.

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